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Complete Auto Repair & Maintenance in Fort Collins Colorado
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7 Car Myths Most People Still Believe

It’s easy to make assumptions about cars based on statements that our parents, pop culture, and car salesmen make. However, there are still far too many car myths floating around out there, so the experts at Scott’s Fort Collins Auto are here to debunk seven of the most common ones.

Car interior white with brown seatsCar Myth: Leather Seats are Superior

There’s a notion that leather is better than fabric upholstery. That new-car smell may be fantastic, but leather can crack in the sun over time. Plus, on hot summer days, touching sun-bathed leather with your bare skin can be downright painful! If you regularly park your car outside, do yourself a favor and opt for fabric upholstery instead of leather seats.

Car Myth: Bigger Engines are Safer in Crashes

Unscrupulous car salesmen might make this claim in an attempt to upsell you, but it’s simply not true. The engine is likely to get pushed back toward the driver during a severe head-on collision, regardless of its size.

Car Myth: Premium Gas is Better for All Cars

When you visit the gas pump to refuel your car, you see three levels of gasoline to choose from: regular, mid-grade, and premium. Many drivers believe premium gasoline boosts engine performance, so they occasionally treat their car to the good stuff.

However, AAA explains that only luxury or performance brand vehicles with turbocharging or supercharging technology require premium gas. This means 70 percent of the cars on American roads receive no extra performance boost from mid-grade or premium gasoline.

Car Myth: It’s Safe to Get Back Inside the Vehicle While Fueling Up

Every time you get in and out of your car, you create a static electricity charge. Ordinarily, this is no big deal, but when you have a gas pump connected to the fuel tank, a spark from your finger could ignite the gas and start a fire.

Your safest option is to stand outside next to your car until the gas is finished pumping. If you must get back inside, discharge the static buildup when you step out by touching a metal surface far from the gas tank before you reach for the pump.

Car Myth: High Speed Limits Cause More Accidents

You probably associate fast driving with accidents. While this is often the case, the real trouble comes when drivers travel at different speeds. As long as the road isn’t sharp and winding, raising the speed limit can actually help traffic flow more smoothly and steadily to prevent accidents.

Car Myth: All-Wheel Drive is Necessary in the Snow

While cars with all-wheel drive help you accelerate from a standstill and maintain control once you get moving, they don’t help you stop any faster. For that, you need the extra traction of winter tires. Any car—whether equipped with all-wheel drive or not—will drive better in the snow with this seasonal upgrade.

Car Myth: You Must Change the Oil Every 3,000 Mile

It was once true that cars needed oil changes every 3,000 miles, but because of the advancements in engine building and synthetic oil, this rule of thumb no longer applies. Instead of assuming your car needs new oil every 3,000 miles, check the vehicle’s service manual. Odds are the manufacturer recommends changing the oil between 7,500 and 10,000 miles—or once a year, whichever comes first. Debunking this car myth can save you substantially over the years!

Service Your Car at Scott’s Today

Now that you know the truth about these car myths, make sure you take good care of your ride with regular servicing at Scott’s. We are your one-stop-shop for all your auto repair and maintenance needs. Whether you need an oil change, new car battery, or timing belt replacement, we have you covered.

Stop by our convenient Fort Collins location today or call ahead at (970) 682-4202. You can also schedule an appointment online.

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